Tag Archives: marty

Martin E. Hubbell Selected For “Top 40 Under 40!”

Marty Hubbell has been selected as a member of The National Trial Lawyers Association:  Top 40 under 40.  He is one of only 40 trial lawyers to be chosen for membership into the association.  Membership into this top young trial attorney organization is by invitation only and extended exclusively to those individuals who exemplify superior qualifications, trial results, and leadership.  Congratulations, Marty, for this great achievement!

http://www.DiehlHubbell.com

513.932.2121

 

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Martin Hubbell named a 2012 Ohio Super Lawyers Rising Star!

 

Congrats, Marty! Named one of Ohio’s top lawyers.

 

Lawyers are asked to nominate the best attorneys who are 40 or under.  They are instructed to nominate lawyers they have personally observed in action – whether as opposing counsel or co-counsel, or through other firsthand courtroom observation.

In addition to the general survey, the attorney-led research team reviews the credentials of potential candidates and assigns points based on a set of defined evaluation criteria. The research staff also confirms that nominees are properly licensed, in good standing with the state licensing agency, and, when possible, that they have no history of disciplinary action that would warrant removal from the list.

The point totals from the general survey and research process are then added to arrive at a final tally. The lawyers are ranked by point totals and those with the highest point totals are named to the Rising Stars list. No more than 2.5 percent of the lawyers in the state are named to the list. To ensure a diverse and well-balanced list, the research staff considers factors such as firm size, practice area and geographic location.

We at Diehl & Hubbell, LLC are proud of Mr. Hubbell and would like to thank him for his years of dedicated service to the Southwest Ohio community!

You can find Mr. Hubbell at 304 East Warren Street, Lebanon, Ohio, 45036  #513.932.2121

http://www.diehlhubbell.com

Are you a Bulldog Lawyer?

By Marty Hubbell

I get asked that at least once a month. All attorneys have heard from potential clients who want to hire a Bulldog to represent them.  Why?  Because they erroneously believe that such lawyers are effective advocates for their clients.

Some people are generally unreasonable and unpleasant; some of these people happen to be lawyers.  It is not hard to find them, as they are usually preceded by reputation.

These Bulldog lawyers have an inability to arrive at appropriate results in a timely fashion.  They don’t return phone calls, are unprepared for hearings, and are unable to competently identify key issues in a case.  But they are wonderful at turning legal cases into personal vendettas, when doing so has no practical purpose.  Legal fees tend to get expensive, quickly, when fighting about anything and everything.

A Bulldog lawyer does not intimidate a competent attorney.  I tell my clients in advance about the other attorney’s reputation, in order to prepare them.  No party to litigation truly enjoys the experience, and you have to wonder about the unnecessary emotional cost their clients pay.

Judges and juries do not appreciate Bulldog lawyers.  Court time is valuable and dockets are crowded.  Recent studies suggest that jurors are particularly sensitive to choosing sides in a trial based upon a Judge’s rulings and demeanor toward individual attorneys.  If an attorney argues ten points of law, when only two are viable, the stain of the poor arguments can filter down to the good ones.

There is so much more to being an effective advocate than just being adversarial.  Be cautious when a lawyer brags about being tough and aggressive.  A competitive spirit should not be confused with a combative personality.  The qualities you should demand in a lawyer are no different than those you would want from other people in your life:  diligence, competence, honesty, and reasonableness.

_____________________

Marty Hubbell is a partner in the law firm of Diehl & Hubbell, LLC  (www.DiehlHubbell.com), and has been practicing criminal defense law in Warren County, Ohio for ten years.  He has been named an Ohio Super Lawyer, and is a part-time Magistrate for the City of Lebanon, Ohio.  He can be reached at (513) 932-2121 or MHubbell@DiehlHubbell.com

Change of Plea for Mason Teacher

http://wcpo.m0bl.net/r/j1udt

Wednesday, July 13th, 2011

By: Gabriel Moorman

Stacy Schuler, the former Mason High School gym teacher accused of having sex with a number of her students, has entered a plea of not guilty by reason of insanity.

This often utilized and rarely successful plea is an attempt by the defense to offer a legal excuse for Ms. Schuler’s actions.  While quite possibly the defendant’s best argument, the requirements for such a plea are very difficult to establish.

The defense, in effect, is not contesting whether or not the sexual conduct took place – they are only arguing that Ms. Schuler did not possess the necessary mental state or intent to commit the crime.

The trial court will order her to be evaluated, and the expert report will probably be provided in about 4-6 weeks.

Her trial is set to begin on August 8th, 2011, at the Warren County Court of Common Pleas in front of Judge Robert Peeler.

 

Volume V, Issue I of Thomas J. Diehl’s Accident and Injury Reporter

www.thomasjdiehl.com/ThomasJDiehl-Publications-personal-injury-warren-county–attorney#entry_39

In this issue of the Accident and Injury Reporter, Mr. Diehl answers frequently asked questions about releases. He discusses a very important Ohio Supreme Court case affecting all persons injured as a result of other persons’ negligence. And, Tom introduces you to our staff of lawyers, paralegals and administrators assisting in providing full and complete recovery for our clients injured in automobile accidents.

Issue #34 of Tom Diehl’s Co-Counsel Reporter

Check out “It Ain’t Over Yet”, by Thomas J. Diehl.  Mr. Diehl discusses tactics to combat the Ohio Supreme Court’s decision in Robinson v. Bates.

http://www.thomasjdiehl.com/ThomasJDiehl-Publications-personal-injury-warren-county–attorney#entry_32

Ohio Attorneys, Diehl and Hubbell, LLC.  A law firm in Southwest, Ohio, since 1988.  We handle personal injury, criminal law, domestic relations, worker’s compensation, and civil litigation.  We practice in all areas of Ohio including Warren, Greene, Montgomery, Clermont, Hamilton, and Highland counties, as well as Dayton, Cincinnati, Lebanon, Mason, Beavercreek, Kettering, Centerville, Waynesville, Ohio.  Give us a call today and let us put our resources to work for you.

Run Over Our Citizens, But Don’t Mess With Our Soybeans

By:  Thomas J. Diehl (In 2008) 

   With the enactment of Senate Bill 80, damages in many tort actions 
are capped.  The jury’s determination of rightful compensation to a 
Plaintiff will be disregarded in many circumstances.  In any claim for 
damages for injury or loss to person or property, including product 
liability claims, a plaintiff who has suffered non-catastrophic or 
noneconomic damages is limited to the greater of Two Hundred Fifty 
Thousand Dollars ($250,000) or three times the economic loss,but not 
to exceed Three Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars ($350,000). 
 
               EXAMPLE NO. 1:    Plaintiff is injured in a non-catastrophic 
motorcycle accident and incurs medical bills of Ten Thousand Dollars 
($10,000) and a wage loss of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000), for total
special damages of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,000).  The most he can 
receive for his non-economic loss (i.e. pain and suffering) is Two Hundred 
Fifty Thousand Dollars ($250,000).  3 x $15,000 = $45,000.  Plaintiff is
entitled to three times economic loss or Two Hundred Fifty Thousand Dollars
($250,000), whichever is greater.
 
               EXAMPLE NO. 2:    Plaintiff is injured in a non-catastrophic
loss and incurs medical bills of One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000)
and wage loss of Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars ($25,000), for a total loss
of One Hundred Twenty-Five Thousand Dollars ($125,000).  If a jury awards
pain and suffering of Five Hundred Thousand Dollars ($500,000), that 
portion of the jury verdict will be reduced to Three Hundred Fifty 
Thousand Dollars ($350,000), because of the cap.  
 
   It seems odd that the Ohio legislature would protect 
drunk and reckless drivers at the expense of truly injured persons.  
Although the Ohio Legislature limits the recovery available to a 
plaintiff seriously injured in a car accident caused by a drunk
driver, it has made certain that producers of corn, wheat and 
soybeans injured by someone speaking badly of their products
are fully compensated.  Ohio Rev. Code §2307.81 subjects anyone
who falsely disparages an Ohio agricultural or aquacultural 
food product, to “in addition to any award of punitive damages, 
damages in an amount up to three times the amount of compensatory 
damages.”
 
    Thus, the Ohio Legislature has chosen to place a cap on the
damages a drunk driver will pay, while it subjects those that may 
dare to disparage a soybean to treble damages.

http://www.thomasjdiehl.com

 

Widmer: Day 2 of Deliberations

By Marty Hubbell

The Ryan Widmer jury deliberations continue into the second day.

I was in the courthouse this morning, and saw the bathtub that the jurors must walk past to get to the jury room.  I’m sure that is a sobering thought as they begin their deliberations.

Yesterday the prosecution requested that Judge Bronson read an instruction on the lessor offense of involuntary manslaughter.  The defense objected, but secretly I think they welcome this option.

If the jury cannot reach a unanimous verdict on the murder charge, they then can discuss the lessor charge of involuntary manslaughter.  Oftentimes, this scenario leads to what is called a compromise verdict.  In my experience, when given two options, and the case is not open-and-shut, juries will choose the lessor charge as a compromise. 

This has already happened in this case.  In the first Widmer trial, the jury was presented with two options:  aggravated murder and murder.  They found him not guilty of aggravated murder but guilty of murder.

In the second trial, the jury just had to consider the murder charge.  Depending on which report you believe, the jury was deadlocked 8-4 or 10-2 in favor of guilt.

Now, the jury will consider the murder charge and the lessor charge of involuntary manslaughter.  I think this jury will reach a verdict, and most likely on the lower charge.

What does this mean for Ryan Widmer?  On the murder charge he is facing a mandatory sentence of 15 years to life in prison.  On the manslaughter charge he is facing one to five years in prison.  Given that he has no prior record, the Court could consider placing him on community control (probation), with no additional jail/prison time.

Ryan Widmer Trial Update- The Jury Deliberates

By Marty Hubbell

Closing arguments ended today in Ryan Widmer’s third trial for the murder of his wife.  This was the attorneys’ opportunity to tell the jury what they believed the evidence showed throughout the case.  The jury will be instructed that the arguments of counsel are not to be considered as evidence.

After closing arguments the judge read the jury instructions and the jurors entered the jury room for deliberations.  All of the exhibits will accompany them, together with the verdict forms. 

Some thoughts on the Widmer case:

1.         Truth really is stranger than fiction.  This case has a lead detective who lied on his police application, a surprise witness that used to work in an Iowa strip joint, a third murder trial, and a married female witness who flew in from Seattle to support the defendant.  And, of course, an expert who worked on the Kennedy assassination and testified at the O.J. Simpson murder trial.

2.         The State’s surprise witness, Jennifer Crew, testified that Ryan Widmer confessed the murder to her.  This witness walked into court with quite a bit of baggage.  But the State had to call her as a witness, as a confession will certainly make jurors’ ears perk up.

That being said, her credibility is in question based upon her prior criminal record and past life choices.  I spoke to multiple people in the courtroom during her testimony, and they gave her testimony a grade from lukewarm to good.

3.         I think the defense team doesn’t expect a NOT GUILTY verdict.  They would like one, but such a finding will be even more difficult after the confession testimony from Jennifer Crew.  Keep in mind, in the two previous trials, depending on which version you believe, either 22/24 or 20/24 jurors have voted GUILTY at the end of the day.

My guess is the defense would be tickled pink to have another hung jury.

4.         People ask me whether Ryan Widmer should testify.  The answer:  hell no.  Rest assured that throughout the three trials Ryan has been prepped and coached to testify, just in case.  My guess is that he has done very poorly in these practice examinations.

5.         One of the confusing parts of the Law is reconciling guilt with proof.  It is entirely possible that a person can be guilty of an offense, but the State lacks the ability to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.

When would this happen?  All the time.  This morning I drove to the airport with almost no traffic on the road.  A portion of I-71 near downtown Cincinnati has a 55 m.p.h. speed limit.  I sped.  Although I am technically guilty of this offense, without additional evidence the State would never be able to prove my guilt beyond a reasonable doubt (even with my admission!). 

A defendant is presumed innocent of a crime.  The State carries the burden to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.  If that burden is not met, it is a juror’s duty to sign the NOT GUILTY verdict form.  Suspicion or ‘probably did it’ does not suffice.

6.         freeryanwidmer.com was a website created to assist Ryan Widmer in the defense of his case.  This is also the website used by the State’s surprise witness, Jennifer Crew, to get in touch with Ryan.  The only real new evidence in this third trial is her testimony.  If convicted, how ironic would it be that the group formed to raise money for Ryan Widmer assisted in his ultimate conviction?