Tag Archives: bathtub

Next up in the Ryan Widmer case.

By Marty Hubbell

What’s next in the Ryan Widmer case?  Expect the defense to file a motion for a new trial in the next few days.  This motion must be filed within 14 days of the verdict that was rendered on February 15, 2011.

This motion is critical for Widmer’s case, and is separate from the appeal of his actual murder conviction.  His appeal would be to the 12th District Court of Appeals in Middletown, Ohio; the motion for a new trial would be heard by Judge Bronson in the Warren County Common Pleas Court.  The appeal will not be filed until the upcoming motion is resolved in the trial court.

Why is this motion for a new trial important?  The 12th District Court of Appeals is probably the most conservative appellate court in the State of Ohio; less criminal convictions are overturned in this court than in any other appellate district.  If he cannot persuade Judge Bronson to grant him a new trial, it is likely that the next significant hearing for Ryan Widmer will occur in about 14.5 years, at his first parole hearing.

The defense attorneys are scrambling to find any and all evidence they can to support the motion.  From the press releases thus far, it appears that they are going to try to argue some form of juror misconduct.

Advertisements

Ryan Widmer Found Guilty of Murder

2/15/11

By:  Gabe Moorman

Warren County Court of Common Pleas Judge Neal Bronson read the verdict at about 5:00PM today after approximately twelve hours of jury deliberation. 

As Ryan Widmer sat waiting, not looking, with his head down on top of his cross-fingered hands, Judge Bronson delivered the news:

GUILTY.

Not of involuntary manslaughter, the lesser included offense of which the jury could consider, but murder.  Cold-blooded, intentional murder.  In other words, the jury found that to a degree of certainty beyond a reasonable doubt, Mr. Widmer purposefully killed his wife, Sarah Widmer.

This conviction calls for a mandatory sentence of fifteen years to life in jail.  This tragic saga has come to an end – finally.

Although this trial and controversy played out like a tv show or a soap opera, it was far from it.  The convicted, the victim, her family and his family are real people.  I think it is important that we remember to be considerate and respectful toward all of the individuals involved.  Their dignity as human beings is immutable.

That summer night back in August of 2008 has, in effect, taken not one, but two lives.  It just took two and a half years to realize.  My heart goes out to Sarah Widmer’s family in this most difficult of times.  We can only hope that justice was served.

For a summary of the Widmer trial and my thoughts on the verdict, tune in to Dayton’s FOX45 In The Morning from 7:00 to 9:00 AM tomorrow, Wednesday, February 16th, 2011.

http://www.diehlhubbell.com

Widmer: Day 2 of Deliberations

By Marty Hubbell

The Ryan Widmer jury deliberations continue into the second day.

I was in the courthouse this morning, and saw the bathtub that the jurors must walk past to get to the jury room.  I’m sure that is a sobering thought as they begin their deliberations.

Yesterday the prosecution requested that Judge Bronson read an instruction on the lessor offense of involuntary manslaughter.  The defense objected, but secretly I think they welcome this option.

If the jury cannot reach a unanimous verdict on the murder charge, they then can discuss the lessor charge of involuntary manslaughter.  Oftentimes, this scenario leads to what is called a compromise verdict.  In my experience, when given two options, and the case is not open-and-shut, juries will choose the lessor charge as a compromise. 

This has already happened in this case.  In the first Widmer trial, the jury was presented with two options:  aggravated murder and murder.  They found him not guilty of aggravated murder but guilty of murder.

In the second trial, the jury just had to consider the murder charge.  Depending on which report you believe, the jury was deadlocked 8-4 or 10-2 in favor of guilt.

Now, the jury will consider the murder charge and the lessor charge of involuntary manslaughter.  I think this jury will reach a verdict, and most likely on the lower charge.

What does this mean for Ryan Widmer?  On the murder charge he is facing a mandatory sentence of 15 years to life in prison.  On the manslaughter charge he is facing one to five years in prison.  Given that he has no prior record, the Court could consider placing him on community control (probation), with no additional jail/prison time.